Information for Authors

Focus and Scope

The international journal International Comparative Jurisprudence (ICJ) is designed to disseminate advanced scholarly thought from multidisciplinary approach to the international audience of researchers and practitioners. The ICJ focuses on theoretical and practical insights to the wide range of political, legislative, social, economic, and other issues of law. It emphasizes the comparative analysis of international jurisprudence as well as the international aspects of national law globally.

The goal of ICJ is to foster greater understanding in the field of comparative cross-border jurisprudence.

To accomplish its mission ICJ:

(i) places itself at the forefront of emerging jurisprudential trends by virtue of strategic guidance of the multinational Board of Advisors, consisting of renowned legal professionals, judges, and legal practitioners;

(ii) provides a forum for discussion on the discourse of legal theory and practice;

(iii) stimulates interdisciplinary, intersectorial and intercultural research;

(iv) expands scholarly resources for legal researchers and practitioners examining various aspects of jurisprudence and providing strong educational opportunities.              

In essence, the ICJ seeks to become both the leading international jurisprudential journal and the reputable source for new areas of legal theory and practice.  

Original scholarly articles in various fields of law including but not limited to legal philosophy and theory, comparative law, legal history, constitutional law, private international law and public international law, European Union law, civil law, administrative law, criminal law, bio law, criminology, legal informatics, etc.

Articles with comparative and interdisciplinary approach on legal problems are top- priority in the process of selecting articles for publication.

Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.

  1. Use of word processing software
    It is important that the file be saved in the native format of the word processor used. The text should be in single-column format. Keep the layout of the text as simple as possible. In particular, do not use the word processor's options to justify text or to hyphenate words. However, do use bold face, italics, subscripts, superscripts etc.
    To avoid unnecessary errors you are strongly advised to use the 'spell-check' and 'grammar-check' functions of your word processor.
  2. Article structure
    Subdivision - numbered sections
    Divide your article into clearly defined and numbered sections. Subsections should be numbered 1.1 (then 1.1.1, 1.1.2, ...), 1.2, etc. (the abstract is not included in section numbering). Use this numbering also for internal cross-referencing: do not just refer to "the text". Any subsection may be given a brief heading. Each heading should appear on its own separate line.
    Introduction

    State the objectives of the work and used methods; provide an adequate background, avoiding a detailed literature survey or a summary of the results.
    Main text
    In this section the topic of article must be revealed and main results of the research presented.
    Conclusions
    The main conclusions of the study must be presented in a short Conclusions section, which should stand alone. Conclusions should also consists of recommendations, how to deal with research problem in future.
    Appendices
    If there is more than one appendix, they should be identified as A, B, etc. Formulae and equations in appendices should be given separate numbering: Eq. (A.1), Eq. (A.2), etc.; in a subsequent appendix, Eq. (B.1) and so on. Similarly for tables and figures: Table A.1; Fig. A.1, etc.
    Essential title page information
    Title. Concise and informative. Titles are often used in information-retrieval systems. Avoid abbreviations and formulae where possible.
    Author names and affiliations. Where the family name may be ambiguous (e.g., a double name), please indicate this clearly. Present the authors' affiliation addresses (where the actual work was done) below the names. Indicate all affiliations with a lower-case superscript letter immediately after the author's name and in front of the appropriate address. Provide the full postal address of each affiliation, including the country name, and the e-mail address of each author.
    Corresponding author. Clearly indicate who will handle correspondence at all stages of refereeing and publication, also post-publication. Ensure that telephone and fax numbers (with country and area code) are provided in addition to the e-mail address and the complete postal address. Contact details must be kept up to date by the corresponding author.
    Present/permanent address. If an author has moved since the work described in the article was done, or was visiting at the time, a "Present address" (or "Permanent address") may be indicated as a footnote to that author's name. The address at which the author actually did the work must be retained as the main, affiliation address. Superscript Arabic numerals are used for such footnotes.
  3. Abstract
    A concise and factual abstract is required. The abstract should state briefly the purpose of the research, the principal results and major conclusions. An abstract is often presented separately from the article, so it must be able to stand alone. For this reason, References should be avoided, but if essential, then cite the author(s) and year(s). Also, non-standard or uncommon abbreviations should be avoided, but if essential they must be defined at their first mention in the abstract itself.
  4. Keywords
    Authors are invited to submit keywords associated with their paper.
  5. Abbreviations
    Define abbreviations that are not standard in this field in a footnote to be placed on the first page of the article. Such abbreviations that are unavoidable in the abstract must be defined at their first mention there, as well as in the footnote. Ensure consistency of abbreviations throughout the article.
  6. Acknowledgements
    Collate acknowledgements in a separate section at the end of the article before the references and do not, therefore, include them on the title page, as a footnote to the title or otherwise. List here those individuals who provided help during the research (e.g., providing language help, writing assistance or proof reading the article, etc.).
  7. Nomenclature and units
    Follow internationally accepted rules and conventions: use the international system of units (SI). If other quantities are mentioned, give their equivalent in SI. Authors wishing to present a table of nomenclature should do so on the second page of their manuscript.
  8. Math formulae
    Present simple formulae in the line of normal text where possible and use the solidus (/) instead of a horizontal line for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y. In principle, variables are to be presented in italics. Powers of e are often more conveniently denoted by exp. Number consecutively any equations that have to be displayed separately from the text (if referred to explicitly in the text).
  9. Footnotes
    Footnotes should be used sparingly. Number them consecutively throughout the article, using superscript Arabic numbers. Many wordprocessors build footnotes into the text, and this feature may be used. Should this not be the case, indicate the position of footnotes in the text and present the footnotes themselves separately at the end of the article. Do not include footnotes in the Reference list.
    Table footnotes
    Indicate each footnote in a table with a superscript lowercase letter.
  10. Artwork
    Electronic artwork
    General points
    • Make sure you use uniform lettering and sizing of your original artwork.
    • Save text in illustrations as "graphics" or enclose the font.
    • Only use the following fonts in your illustrations: Arial, Courier, Times, Symbol.
    • Number the illustrations according to their sequence in the text.
    • Use a logical naming convention for your artwork files.
    • Provide captions to illustrations separately.
    • Produce images near to the desired size of the printed version.
    • Submit each figure as a separate file.
    Formats
    Regardless of the application used, when your electronic artwork is finalised, please "save as" or convert the images to one of the following formats (note the resolution requirements for line drawings, halftones, and line/halftone combinations given below):
    EPS: Vector drawings. Embed the font or save the text as "graphics".
    TIFF: color or grayscale photographs (halftones): always use a minimum of 300 dpi.
    TIFF: Bitmapped line drawings: use a minimum of 1000 dpi.
    TIFF: Combinations bitmapped line/half-tone (color or grayscale): a minimum of 500 dpi is required.
    If your electronic artwork is created in a Microsoft Office application (Word, PowerPoint, Excel) then please supply "as is".
    Please do not:
    • Supply files that are optimised for screen use (like GIF, BMP, PICT, WPG); the resolution is too low;
    • Supply files that are too low in resolution;
    • Submit graphics that are disproportionately large for the content.
    Color artwork
    Please make sure that artwork files are in an acceptable format (TIFF, EPS or MS Office files) and with the correct resolution. If, together with your accepted article, you submit usable color figures then Elsevier will ensure, at no additional charge, that these figures will appear in color on the Web (e.g., ScienceDirect and other sites) regardless of whether or not these illustrations are reproduced in color in the printed version.
    Figure captions
    Ensure that each illustration has a caption. Supply captions separately, not attached to the figure. A caption should comprise a brief title (not on the figure itself) and a description of the illustration. Keep text in the illustrations themselves to a minimum but explain all symbols and abbreviations used.
  11. Tables
    Number tables consecutively in accordance with their appearance in the text. Place footnotes to tables below the table body and indicate them with superscript lowercase letters. Avoid vertical rules. Be sparing in the use of tables and ensure that the data presented in tables do not duplicate results described elsewhere in the article.
  12. References
    Citation in text
    Please ensure that every citation is provided with reference in text Citation of a reference as 'in press' implies that the item has been accepted for publication and a copy of the title page of the relevant article must be submitted.
    Please ensure that every reference cited in the text is also present in the reference list (and vice versa). Any references cited in the abstract must be given in full. Unpublished results and personal communications are not recommended to use as a source, but may be mentioned in the text. Such sources are not recommended to include in the reference list.  If these references are included in the reference list they should follow the standard reference style of the journal and should include a substitution of the publication date with either "Unpublished results" or "Personal communication" Citation of a reference as "in press" implies that the item has been accepted for publication.
    Web references
    As a minimum, the full URL should be given and the date when the reference was last accessed. Any further information, if known (DOI, author names, dates, reference to a source publication, etc.), should also be given. Web references can be listed separately (e.g., after the reference list) under a different heading if desired, or can be included in the reference list.
    References in a special issue
    Please ensure that the words 'this issue' are added to any references in the list (and any citations in the text) to other articles in the same Special Issue.
    Reference style

    Citations in text should follow the APA referencing style (for more information, please visit: http://www.apastyle.org/learn/quick-guide-on-references.aspx).
    In-text citations consist of the surname(s) of the author(s) and the year of publication.
    If there is no author, use the title (or a short form of the title, if it is lengthy) and the year.
    If there is no date, use “n.d.” instead.
    List: References should be arranged first alphabetically and then further sorted chronologically if necessary.

    Journal abbreviations source
    Journal names should be abbreviated according to
    List of title word abbreviations: http://www.issn.org/2-22661-LTWA-online.php;
  13. Role of the funding source
    You are requested to identify who provided financial support for the conduct of the research and/or preparation of the article and to briefly describe the role of the sponsor(s), if any, in study design; in the collection, analysis and interpretation of data; in the writing of the report; and in the decision to submit the paper for publication. If the funding source(s) had no such involvement then this should be stated.

Contact Details for Submission

Please send your manuscript a.tvaronaviciene@mruni.eu

All correspondence, including notification of the Editor's decision and requests for revision, takes place by e-mail.

Language (usage and editing services)

Please write your text in good English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language manuscript may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English are strongly encouraged to seek for English Language Editing services.

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